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pure calcium hypochlorite


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#1 swamptoad

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 09:36 AM

Does anyone know where I can find a pure calcium hypochlorite (74%?) for water purification? I have read bad things about using the stuff used in pools.

#2 Twitchy

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 10:59 PM

Does anyone know where I can find a pure calcium hypochlorite (74%?) for water purification? I have read bad things about using the stuff used in pools.


A better bet for water purification is a filter.... Chemical purification only disinfects water, it doesn't purify it as it does not remove toxins, heavy metals, etc.

#3 swamptoad

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Posted 16 October 2012 - 06:36 PM

right. i have a filter i just wanted to use both.

#4 Livvi

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Posted 17 October 2012 - 09:25 PM

Would using both work? I have a filter and have to agree with Twitchy, you can't get better! Any type of chemical purification will not remove all the toxins a filter would. I would be interested in knowing if using both would be effective or if the filter would cancel out the chemical purifier?

#5 SifuPhil

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 07:23 AM

A better bet for water purification is a filter.... Chemical purification only disinfects water, it doesn't purify it as it does not remove toxins, heavy metals, etc.


I'm a little confused here ...

Chemical purification would, I think, work at a far finer scale than physical methods. Lead, for example - depending upon the alkalinity and oxygen levels present it may appear in several precipitated forms, most of which could be removed with physical filtration. But when conditions are just right and lead actually dissolves in water, then no amount of physical filtration will remove it - that's when something like ion exchange filters become important, ion exchange of course being technically a chemical process.

#6 Twitchy

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Posted 25 October 2012 - 04:13 PM

I'm a little confused here ...

Chemical purification would, I think, work at a far finer scale than physical methods. Lead, for example - depending upon the alkalinity and oxygen levels present it may appear in several precipitated forms, most of which could be removed with physical filtration. But when conditions are just right and lead actually dissolves in water, then no amount of physical filtration will remove it - that's when something like ion exchange filters become important, ion exchange of course being technically a chemical process.


The filters I speak of aren't simply physical in means of removing contaminants... Its a ceramic filter with activated charcoal to remove contaminants...

#7 SifuPhil

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Posted 27 October 2012 - 08:24 AM

The filters I speak of aren't simply physical in means of removing contaminants... Its a ceramic filter with activated charcoal to remove contaminants...


Ok.

Activated charcoal works by adsorption, and adsorption is known to be inefficient in removing:
  • Lithium (Eskalith, Lithobid), strong acids and bases, metals and inorganic minerals such as sodium, iron, lead, arsenic, iodine, fluorine, and boric acid.
  • Alcohol (such as ethanol, methanol, isopropyl alcohol, glycols, and acetone)
  • Hydrocarbons (such as petroleum distillates and plant hydrocarbons such as pine oil)


#8 swamptoad

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Posted 01 November 2012 - 04:35 PM

I think a lot of ceramic filters will filter bacteria to .2 microns but not viruses.

#9 xtron

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 05:58 PM

chemical treatments will kill off living organisms..like virusis and bacteria...these are what make you sick in the first couple days.

unless the water has toxic levels of chemicals, chemical poisoning takes time to show and to effect your health.

++if you want to use a filter to remove toxins and chemicals, use it first, then use the chemical treatment to kill off anything living that the filter missed.

and remember, filters are a short term application...they only last so long....so a clean, safe water source needs to be in the top 3 on your priority list.



#10 WolfBrother

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 02:51 PM

Part of my duties as a Field medic was to check on/ensure proper water purification.  For the most part we used HTH crystals (calcium hypochlorite). 

 

If you read FM 21-10 Field Hygiene and Sanitation, you'll find that info there.

One of the ways we used to test the water, later on, I found out was simply a swimming pool test kit.  Buy some, buy the refils, test your water for residual chlorine and PH.  It'll make your coffee safer to drink.

 

Pool Shock - listing the only active ingredient as calcium hypochlorite - is a good substitute for the HTH crystals.

ANY pool chemical that lists ANY additional active ingredient other than Calcium Hypochlorite is a NO GO.

 

ANY pool chemical that notes it's "stabilized" is a NO GO. It contains cyanuric acid, CYA, also known as isocyanuric acid.  The BASE compound of the stabilizer is CN- which is cyanide.  Personally, I don't particularly want to be drinking anything like that.

 

NONE of this removes other organic chemicals (gasoline etc) nor metals, nor hard water minerals. 

 

All it does is kill the bugs and virii that make you sick.  You'll still need a way to get rid of the other stuff.



#11 Twitchy

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 06:03 PM

Part of my duties as a Field medic was to check on/ensure proper water purification.  For the most part we used HTH crystals (calcium hypochlorite). 

 

If you read FM 21-10 Field Hygiene and Sanitation, you'll find that info there.

One of the ways we used to test the water, later on, I found out was simply a swimming pool test kit.  Buy some, buy the refils, test your water for residual chlorine and PH.  It'll make your coffee safer to drink.

 

Pool Shock - listing the only active ingredient as calcium hypochlorite - is a good substitute for the HTH crystals.

ANY pool chemical that lists ANY additional active ingredient other than Calcium Hypochlorite is a NO GO.

 

ANY pool chemical that notes it's "stabilized" is a NO GO. It contains cyanuric acid, CYA, also known as isocyanuric acid.  The BASE compound of the stabilizer is CN- which is cyanide.  Personally, I don't particularly want to be drinking anything like that.

 

NONE of this removes other organic chemicals (gasoline etc) nor metals, nor hard water minerals. 

 

All it does is kill the bugs and virii that make you sick.  You'll still need a way to get rid of the other stuff.

 

Good information... What ways are there to remove the harmful things like hydrocarbons, etc.?



#12 WolfBrother

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 10:51 AM

Good information... What ways are there to remove the harmful things like hydrocarbons, etc.?

There are hydrocarbons that water floats on.
There are hydrocarbons that floats on water.

There are hydrocarbons that are miscible - i.e. like alcohol - that mixes in water.

 

First two are simple - either manually draw it off the bottom or top

The third one - ???  not as sure.



#13 Twitchy

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 08:17 PM

There are hydrocarbons that water floats on.
There are hydrocarbons that floats on water.

There are hydrocarbons that are miscible - i.e. like alcohol - that mixes in water.

 

First two are simple - either manually draw it off the bottom or top

The third one - ???  not as sure.

Exactly... alcohol is a great example of how to filter it... unless the ceramic will get it, or the AC...






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